A Confederation…prior to an independent Flanders

  • The N-VA holds on to its “ideal”: independence for Flanders.
  • While it waits for the Flemish people to follow, it advocates confederation.
  • Flanders and Wallonia would leave only defense, security, finance and foreign affairs to the confederated state.
  • And Brussels?  Dismantled…

Two days after revealing its socio-economic plan, the N-VA was back in front of the cameras in its institutional construction zone. And in the halls of the European parliament… “But we are a European party!” says Brussels Senator Karl Vanlouwe. “We support Flanders, Brussels and Europe.”

 

Like Europe, “whose north loves butter and beer,” while the south is “more attracted to oil and wine,” the “two Belgian democracies” need a change of regime. They must move away from federalism, which is “too complicated and too expensive,” to confederalism, “less costly and more efficient.” Flanders and Wallonia must move from “having to work together” to “wanting to work together.”

 

The presentation mentioned a government made up of six ministers, reduced to taking care of defense, security, finance and foreign affairs, and a 50-deputy parliament drawn equally from the Flemish and Walloon parliaments.

 

And Brussels? “Brussels will remain a separate Region,” deputy Jan Jambon emphasized. “As in Paris, there would be a level of power in which communities, police precincts and CPAS are merged. And, like in Antwerp, there would be districts and neighborhoods.” Brussels would maintain its regional responsibilities but would cede personal matters to the Communities. “Residents of Brussels,” Jan Jambon smiled, “will choose between Wallonia and Flanders for their social security system and their family welfare. They could even move between systems after a few years…”

 

For deputy Siegfried Bracke: “This is 21st century Belgium!”

 

MICHELLE LAMENSCH

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One Response to A Confederation…prior to an independent Flanders

  1. Paul says:

    Well, the least one could say is that the NVA, once more, produces the kind of news every one likes to talk about.
    There’s a lot to be said for the argument that no one needs a top-heavy and financially gargantuan Belgian government in a scenario whereby every one might be perfectly served by their local elected nation, each assuming their responsibilities and without undue interference from any other entity, provided same are in concert with the guidelines of the overruling European level.
    There is no doubt that there is no need for any Royalty to manoeuvre his way into political decision-making; waving the flag is sufficient.
    There can be no doubt that Brussels is a city, whereof the citizens have a full right to determine for themselves, at their sole responsibility, what may be their local composition: all they need do is have their Belgian citizens vote, within the limits of their constitutional rights. Nor need they fear: that same constitution is there to fully protect their rights, if not their desires. One needs to reflect that there is a construction called “double-qualified majority” (might it be “triple”?) making it perfectly impossible to (rapidly) make any profound changes to the Belgian political constellation, and there is no doubt whatever that a lot of murky Senne waters are yet to flow under the “capital of Europe” before the ink of any agreement will have been written, let alone dried-up.
    In the meanwhile, the respective parties have something to think about, to reflect upon and excercise their alleged capacity to continuously fabricate those famous “Belgian” compromises, in the knowledge that the soup is never eaten nearly as hot as served, and that no one, in a democracy, ever gets fully what they want.
    Have a nice day!

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